Posted tagged ‘iron frying pan sonnet’

“Second Marriage” (Out of the Frying Pan and Into the….)

September 6, 2012

Iron Pan

Second Marriage

He’s the kind of guy who carefully seasons
an iron skillet, oiling the surface,
eschewing soap.  I know all the reasons,
understand rust, stickiness; nonetheless,
I squeeze Dawn right onto the blackness,
and when I smell that low-heated oil, I
rebel.  “Are you,” I charge (nearly senseless),
seasoning my frying pan?” As if to try
traditional method, some slow process
of caretaking, were a sure scheme to defy,
deny, descry, the rushed independence
I’ve professed; those hurry-up lone years I
scraped so many sharp implements across,
getting rid of the hard bits, loss and loss.

****************************

Here is an older sonnet that I am reposting today (i) because I’ve always liked it, and (ii) for dVerse Poets Pub’s prompt on the use of symbols in poetry, hosted by the wonderful Victoria C. Slotto.

Check out dVerse and Victoria’s article, and the other poets, and check out my books!  Poetry, GOING ON SOMEWHERE, (by Karin Gustafson, illustrated by Diana Barco). 1 Mississippi -counting book for lovers of rivers, light and pachyderms, or Nose Dive, a very fun novel that is perfect for a pool or beachside escape.  Nose Dive is available on Kindle for just 99 cents!

18th Day of National Poetry Month – “Second Marriage” (and more on Sonnets!)

April 18, 2010

Iron Pan

18 days of draft poems!

I have to confess that it was hard today to come up with something to write about.  My mind felt blank;  anything I did come up with seemed too personal for a blog post.  (It’s one thing to be personal in a finished poem;  another to be overly personal in a draft.) Finally, I bugged my husband for a topic;  in the middle of cooking, he came up with “iron frying pan.”   Although this seemed a promising starting point, my blank mind had a hard time fitting words around it until I decided to try my own advice from prior posts, and turn to a traditional poetic form, a sonnet.

The sonnet is one of my favorite forms:  the interlocking lines lead you through the poem, which, because it is only fourteen lines, thankfully, can’t, go on too long.  I heartily recommend trying one!

A couple of hints:  it is useful to number your lines (in the margins) after you get to the 8th or 9th, as it is amazingly easy to lose track of where you are.   Also, I find it easier to write sonnets in a notebook by hand, than on the computer.   Nearly every time I begin to run out of steam, I re-copy what I’ve done up to that point; sometimes tearing out my prior page so I can see it better.  The re-copying allows me to refresh my momentum, and also to clarify where the poem is going, or stuck.   Weirdly enough, it seems  easier to cut out whole lines and phrases when you are writing by hand and re-copying than when you are on the computer.   It is much easier to give undeserved authority to words in typeface than to barely legible scribbles.

Anyway, here’s the draft of the day:

Second Marriage

He’s the kind of guy who carefully seasons
an iron skillet, oiling the surface,
eschewing soap.  I know all the reasons,
understand rust, stickiness, nonetheless,
I squeeze Dawn right onto the blackness,
and when I smell that low-heated oil, I
rebel.  “Are you,” I charge (nearly senseless),
seasoning my frying pan?” As if to try
traditional method, some slow process
of caretaking, is intended to defy,
deny, descry, the rushed independence
I’ve professed, those hurry-up lone years I
scraped so many sharp implements across,
getting rid of the hard bits, loss and loss.